Whether it’s a trailer to haul your boat or some cargo, one of the most important trailer parts you have to pay special attention to are the brakes. Being able to properly stop your trailer is integral to your safety. When you’re towing a trailer, you’re usually pulling on thousands of pounds; you wouldn’t want all that weight to keep on moving forward when you step on your brakes. Depending on your towing vehicle’s brakes alone will not be enough to stop your trailer; having functional brakes on your trailer will greatly help in slowing down your vehicle.

Trailer brakes are typically classified into two: electric types and surge types. Basic electric trailer brakes are activated by either a connection to your towing vehicle’s brake pedal or an on-board switch on your trailer that’s activated by the inertia of your slowing down. Once activated, an electric current magnetizes your braking system, the strength of which is dependent on how fast you are decelerating.


Well-maintained boat trailer bearings are another part of ensuring your trailer is in good condition. Ball bearings can be found in your wheels and they ensure that your trailer wheels are functioning properly. Usually packed in the wheel hub with lubricants, ball bearings ensure that you can tow your trailer smoothly and lowers the friction caused by your boat’s weight; without it, your trailer would grind down to a halt due to your boat’s weight. Replace and apply lubricant to these bearings when necessary, especially if they start to become noisy.


Another important part to be aware of are the brakes on your trailer. You’ll want your trailer to stop at the same time as your towing vehicle so as to avoid any accidents. Furthermore, faulty brakes can cause friction in your wheel bearings, resulting in serious and costly damage. Check the brake fluid in your trailer to see if it is at the right level and see to it that the brake lines are not leaking.

Now that you’re a proud owner of a utility trailer, whether from buying a pre-made one or constructing one with one of the many complete utility trailer kits available on the market, you should consider improving it eventually. This is because many of these DIY trailers were designed to meet only the minimum requirements that people require of them, both in safety and in functionality. If you want to get the most out of your trailer, you’ll need to put in some work to make sure it’s up to your standards or more.

The life of a competitive angler is not an easy one, especially on the pocket. One would be splurging a hefty sum on gear to include in his tackle box—the finest baits, lines, and rods money could buy. However, an angler’s life doesn’t begin and end with his fishing gear alone; among everything he has, it wouldn’t be wise to not have his own boat and its accompanying trailer to aid him.
The boat itself is obviously one of the topmost concerns when it comes to maintenance. After all, it’s the vehicle that can get its owner out to the best spot in the water—but what about the trailer that carries it? Regular visits to a leading trailer parts store like Champion Trailers to purchase quality parts and accessories, as well as consistent maintenance practices should never be ignored. As About.com writer Tom Locchaas notes, “Routine inspections and maintenance keep your trailer safe and working and can extend its life for many years.”

As you drive your boat from the shelter of your home, through the highway and into the lake, its safety will hinge on a large part on the reliability of your boat trailer parts. For this reason, you should always see to it that you get your hauling equipment inspected and tested for safety and the necessary repairs. For one, an article in the Practical Fishing Tips blog recommends checking up on the drum brakes.

If you own a boat and use it often, chances are you’ll be shopping for trailer tires very soon. Come boating season, your trailer’s tires will get dragged over and across more curbs than most car tires do in their lifetimes. Trailer tires perform a difficult and important task, so when it’s finally time to replace them, be sure to purchase a decent set and care for them well.


Does your truck make irritating screechy sounds whenever you make a turn around a curve? Or does it feel “wiggly”? Chances are your wheel bearings aren’t in good condition.

Bearings keep the wheels from wearing out due to friction. These parts facilitate smooth rotation and keep the wheels from decelerating due to the weight of loads pressing down from above, or due to turning around a tight curve.